SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS

SEXUALITY ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM

Autistic adults have, in general, differences in sexuality from the norm. Many more are asexual than in the average population. It is believed that there is a slightly higher pecentage of gays, lesbians, bisexual, and transgendered autistics than in the average population.

Bisexual or homosexual Aspies may find more potential for sex and/or relationships in the gay community where there is less emphasis on conformity. Girls and women who are autistic can have more chance at success in relationships, generally speaking, than men. This is due to differences in social requirements, where a man is often expected to ask a girl for a date, rather than vice versa.

Living in a society where long-time relationships and starting a family are the norm it can be very hard for socially inexperienced men with Asperger’s to find a partner and some stay away from dating for that reason.

Some of those on the autism spectrum are celibate by choice, feeling that they are asexual, or that there are more important things in life. Others have resigned themselves to celibacy due to the fact that romantic or sexual relationships can be much harder to find due to a misunderstanding of social skills and the difficulty of finding a suitable partner.

Aspie/aspie couples are often more succesful than aspie/neurotypical couples; yet this is not done often as aspie gender ratios has a lot more diagnosed males than females. It is thought that there is often underdiagnosis of females. Sexual feelings may develop later than usual, and relationships can start in the 20s and 30s, rather than in teenage years, as for neurotypicals. (source: Aspies for freedom wiki)

SEX/RELATIONSHIP GUIDES

There are plenty of high quality sex/relationship guides around, so this section is deliberately brief. The key to learning from these guides is knowing that they are nearly always written from the perspective of someone who has had personal success or who has had success in teaching non-autistic people and who are trying to teach specific things from particular perspectives.

Read full article on www.autism-help.org